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Current information follows regarding the former
Green Mountain Racetrack, in Pownal, Vermont. STGD! was instrumental in its closing and making sure that it stayed closed. To date the kennels are gone!

The property, which was purchased by various businesses, is still undeveloped. However, plans are for green businesses and commercial ventures to locate at this facility.

Words from one of the Town fathers to STGD! were, "There will be no more animals there - ever!"....

This was what our bill s.152 (Gator's bill) was all about.

Read more about the Gator bill by clicking here now.



Who Are We?

Save the Greyhound Dogs! (STGD!)
is a 501(C)(3) non-profit/educational organization that embraces people of good conscience and responsibility. Our purpose is to speak out for Greyhounds who have no voice of their own.

Click here for our Mission Statement

Photos of Greyhound Abuse
"We love our dogs", claim the Greyhound Industry. Do these photos prove otherwise? Don't you agree? [More]

My experience in a behind the scenes visit to a New Hampshire Greyhound race track:

Written by Scotti At the end of September, a few years ago, I went with two other individuals to the Lake Region Greyhound Park. We were there to clean greyhound racing dogs that were of no further use to their owners or to the track when racing was at an end. This track runs through Labor Day. In years gone by, when this time on the calendar approached, all knowledge people know what was about to occur. The phrase given to the situation was aptly named “The October Massacre.” I did not create this name; someone else created it that had full knowledge of what was about to happen.

This particular year, I made contact with management at the track, asking whether they would enable me to arrange the safe removal of the dogs through arrangements that we would make with various greyhound adoption organizations. And while this was what we wanted, we knew full well that we were relieving them of work, expenses and more public scrutiny. They agreed to our request.

On Sunday morning at 8:15 am, I arrived at the track along with two other individuals. We brought our own towels, cloths and paper; we brought our own flea and tick cleansing solutions. We brought our own scrub brushes; nail clippers and everything imaginable to ideally ready these dogs for the adoption organization, with whom we had made arrangements. We, incidentally, contacted every one of the organizations east of Mississippi.

What we encountered was overwhelming, even to seasoned professionals. The filth and stench inside the crates was unimaginable; urine soaked newspapers, feces on the bottom and sides of the crates, feces and urine covering the dogs. Only the most dedicated or the most immune would work on these dogs, but work we did. They are not only too small, but the wood construction holds the bacteria, germs, and odor and allows no cleansing at all. We quickly realized that most of the dogs were sitting, in some cases, directly on the wood bottom of these filthy crates.

When we inspected the grounds where, as these track owners claim the dogs that they “love” are supposed to exercise, we found more filth, beer cans and trash refuse containers in every possible place. We wondered whom exactly they were trying to fool. This recreational and exercise area would certainly cause cuts, bruises and the like, resulting in only more pain and suffering.

There are no words that would enable me to describe the foul, obscene odor emanating from the trays and containers of food that would be fed to these dogs later in the day. Please note that the food was not refrigerated, but sitting out, covered with insects.

It is painfully clear to see the terror and misery in the eyes and on the faces of just these two otherwise doomed dogs. Multiply that by the other one hundred plus that were there on just that one-day. The building was cold. Keep in mind that this was late September; no heated facilities were available from what I was told upon questioning the then kennel manager.

Three of us worked from 8:15am until 3:34 that afternoon, no break, no humor, no nice warm coffee, we knew that this would be our only opportunity to ready these dogs. Each and every dog was cleaned, soothed and given the touch of human hands that did not hit, abuse or punch. They were not screamed at, shoved into crates or terrorized. Over 90% of these dogs were tick and flea infested. Can anyone imagine the task of removing this infestation? Certainly not the management of this track. Would everyone not agree on this? Clearly the utter disgust and painful emotions experienced that day will be a part of my life and soul forever. And I am just one person. Can you only imagine how many New Hampshire residents feel similarly? Personal feelings have not been included in this communication so as to create a report of conditions, not ones thoughts and pains.